Month: December 2010

There’s a name for hot young dads: ikumen

This new word イクメン combine the slang ikemen, which means attractive man, with iku, which means child-raising. It is one of the many, many sub-categories of men I find very hot in Tokyo. Watching men whose main accessories are their toddlers inspires admiration and lust.

And, like every trend in Japan, it’s been fully commercialized, including a special section of Takashimaya department store’s website! For more 2010 new words, check out this Japan Times article.

Listed as one of CNNgo’s top 10 Japan blogs in English

Wow! This simple blog has been cited by CNNgo as one of the top 10 Japan blogs in English. I like how the CNNgo description identifies me as being “married to a Japanese man” but is indeterminate about my gender and my readers’.

“So ladies” is how CNNgo addresses my readers. I welcome female readers but don’t think that’s the total of my readers. Hello?! Isn’t it 100% clear that I am a queer guy?! Haha on CNNgo for reflecting Japan’s inability to see gayness no matter how flagrant!

Some of the other picks are my regular reading material. Congrats #1 Green Eyed Geisha for continually inspiring me. I am also thrilled to be included with Vivian’s Lost in Translation blog.

Is wrestling’s “butt drag” sexual assault?!

This high school student is being charged in rural California with sexual assault for performing a wrestling maneuver called a “butt drag.” The NY Times unhelpfully explains that a “butt drag” is “involves grabbing the haunch of an opponent to gain leverage.” It may also have involved non-consensual penetration, but the story is kinda vague on exactly what happened.

I’d like to know more about wrestling and about the student’s mom’s hair-do.

Japanese Marines teach you how to salute with iPhone app & campy video

Not being a big fan of war and violence, I find it satisfying to see the militaries of the world spending their money on making silly iPhone apps and super-campy YouTube videos. This delightful instructional video comes from Japan’s Ministry of Self Defense, and shows how sailors and viewers can use their iPhone to learn how to properly salute.

Although this will not be well received by some of Japan’s Asian neighbors, there’s an extra high MOE benefit to this education that requires no subtitles! Too bad that the free app is not available on Apple’s US App Store. Tear down the wall, Steve Jobs!