sublime

And the Hunky Jesus winner is . . . Baby Jesus

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Like Folsom Street Fair, the Hunky Jesus and WTF Mary contest marks the SF spiritual calendar of fantasy, spectacle and the sublime. This was the 36th annual contest and my first HJ in many years since I’ve been living in Tokyo.

I like how each Jesus created their own storyline, often independent of the Christian chronology. A 9 month pregnant woman won WTF Mary. “Good timing on her part,” as my friend said. Baby Jesus, “I’m just a baby,” won the HJ category. His is probably the sexiest adult diaper I have ever seen, and he won a lot of attention by pouring milk from his baby bottle across his hairy chest.

Thanks, Sister Roma, and all the good nuns for an outstanding event that brought together freaks, families, and pure joy.

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Random Gay Tokyo life

Sublime and random Tokyo gay stories in August:

1. A gay Italian visitor to Tokyo is *shocked* at the sight of Japanese men using paper fans to cool themselves on trains and sidewalks. “In Italy, only women and fags dare use a fan.” There is nothing more satisfying than observing an Italian man surprised by another nation’s male effeminacy.

2. My new super-gay hairdresser (rare in a country where most are straight) has recently told me about his working the festival circuit with his yakuza friends carrying a portable shrine shoulder to shoulder and dressed in fundoshi (ritual male thongs), his earlier stint at a Ginza hair salon when he cut the hair of  minor royals, and advice about yankii and nudist beachs in Chiba.

A few years younger than this author, my new gay Japanese sensei is also a middle-aged competitive body builder, with distinct orange in his hair and skin tone. Did I mention that we met at Haguromo, the super-gay and sometimes yakuza-filled sento? How often can I get my short hair cut? He’s talented with hair and full of helpful stories and expressions.

3. I’ve heard that many Japanese prefer “small faces.” Just recently, a Japanese friend explained that Japanese distinguish between weak faces (うすい、薄い)and strong faces(こい、濃い). Previously I understand that these adjectives are applied to liquids like tea (literally, the concentration through quantity and steeping time) and even to food types (sort of like light and heavy).

Apparently with people, so-called weak faces have “fewer distinguishing features” or “fewer things sticking out.” Strong faces have deep set eyes, large noses, more prominent chins. This distinction is at once racial and yet pretends not to be.  I have a hard time grokking this, but will be more open to hearing about these immutable differences.

Boys in training

At a Tokyo university that shall not be named, I was startled by, and drawn to, loud male shouting. Imagine my glee at discovering these college students simultaneously pushing each other into stretching poses and shouting at full volume. I have no idea what they were saying, but the camaraderie and aggression made a sublime pairing. Later, I spotted them running around the campus carrying 2 liter plastic bottles full of water. Their faces mixed determination with exhaustion. This was *very* moe.

More moe: a salaryman waiting

Enough arts & crafts. I am certain that most of my readers are more interested in moe. No?

I was waiting patiently at the lobby of a large multinational, and couldn’t help notice this young salaryman also waiting. He stood in the center of the lobby, holding the visitor badges for his guests, rocking on one foot.

There was something sublime about this mix of attention and boredom, formality and fashion, hard surfaces and human activity, security and hospitality. I should have taken a short movie ;-(