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Riding bicycle with no eyebrows

yotsuya_bicycle_no_eyebrows

Is that safe cycling?

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Nearly naked men splashing water on eachother to thank gods

I don’t fully understand why, but these men are celebrating their beloved water source and its miraculous return by throwing water on each other in winter. And, as its a sacred ritual, they are wearing almost no clothing. It’s called Yu kake matsuri (湯かけ祭り), which basically means water splashing festival.  Thanks to the hubb for forwarding this video.

It’s not OK to wear slippers outdoors

OK. I said it. I try to be open-minded about fashion, but sometimes I just have to say “no!”

Walking towards an appointment at a university in Yotsuya, I noticed that this young guy was wearing a new fashion: an informal shirt with a plaid tie. The new part was that the tie material exactly matched a small detail at the bottom of the shirt’s seam. Way to retail matching parts and look put together even if the shirt is not conventionally associated with ties.

What deeply offended me is that this young guy was wearing slippers. Yuck! Walking through Tokyo in bedroom slippers is unsanitary, unpolished, and unacceptable. These soft slippers are bad, but not as bad as the other university I often visit where students (and some faculty) wear those horrid plastic slippers that are best relegated to “bathroom slipper status.” I think those wearing them consider them comfortable, but I just see them as the nastiest excuse for footwear on earth. I’d rather go barefoot!

I hope that this public fashion photo satisfies some of the readers who offered such lovely congratulations recently. I am sorry if not all street fashion is Tokyo Moe approved. Just noted and dispersed.

Pokemon says no

Pokemon says no

Pokemon says “no” to bottle of booze, green tea, congratulatory and funeral flowers, school children’s backpacks, incense, expensive fruit baskets, and gifts of rice. I don’t know whether to laugh or cry seeing this government poster. Is it patronizing, funny or just ridiculous?

Given widespread corruption, not so different in Japan as in the United States– including dead people voting, illegal corporate contributions and staggering levels of distrust– do citizens need a children’s cartoon to tell them about the dangers and illegality of accepting small gifts from politicians?

Are small gifts the reason why Japanese politics are so dismal?