boots in

Shinjuku omatsuri full of yankiis

In addition to endless thass, there was endless yankii fashion at the omatsuri. No doubt this festival was extra riche in eye candy because the shrine is almost equidistant from Kabukicho, Golden Gai, and Ni-chome. According to Donald Richie, this old shrine was famous in the post-war years for being a place where truckers met trannies.

The above photo captures the absolute best of yankii fashion. The boys with their teased, damaged, and plastered helmet hair, and boots-in. The girl with piled high hair, looking both 50s in her leather jacket, 60s and 80s in her curvaceous fishnets. The best part is that all are eating food on a stick: two are eating pickled cukes and one an ice-cream.

In the photo below, they seem to have realized they captured a new fan. And I love how the more traditional fellow does a double-take, perhaps more startled by the foreigner’s interest than the archetypical fashion participating in this thousands year old religion. You can also see the girl’s shoes and her amazing legs much better!

Trust me, there were more big-haired boys than I could possible capture with my simple camera. Here’s one more. I am looking forward to the start of summer.

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Fashionable guys handing out tissues

Outside the large stations, there’s always guys handing out free tissues. In front of Shinjuku’s southeast entrance, there’s often absurdly over-groomed guys distributing this amenity as advertising medium. Both guys are dressed in black, with seriously distressed jeans (one boots-in, one boots-out). I wonder if they go to the same hair dresser: similar color, although one has longer hair, the other taller hair. The guy in the face mask has obviously missed all these fashion lessons.

More boots-in

This department store shopper manages to combine “boots-in” with several other current trends. The low slung and non-functional studded belt. The dangly purse that resembles what hair dressers use to hold their scissors and clippers; for non-pros, it’s like a mini-man purse for wallet and cellphone, often wide open and facing the backside. There’s also the bag that looks like a fanny bag but is worn like a messenger bag across one shoulder. Plus a long, gratuitous extra chain.

Boots in

A new male youth fashion is called “boots in.” It involves super skinny pants, often jeans but not always, tucked inside mid-calf boots. This guy’s shoes are not as impressive as his overall pose. But it gives you the idea.

Shouldn’t it be called “pants in” instead of “boots in”? Oh well, Japanese English is always unpredictable.